Childhood Memories

Sunday Whirl 115I remember life in a white farmhouse by the bend in a dirt lane.  Late afternoons my brother and I ran behind the barns and through the meadow to bring in the cows.  Down that lane past the white house and stained barns was a bridge under which we brought up minnow baskets filled with baby snakes.  I remember another creek without a bridge which we forded on an island of smooth rock.  Heavy rains could make fording unstable for cars and trucks, but tractors could make it through the water without flooding out.

To my knowledge we never saw a black bear on our farm, but we saw all manner of other wild life.  A bird, the crow, was probably one of the most intelligent.  I remember my father fighting the crows and worms for our corn.  I also remember many fallen varieties of fruit covered with yellow jackets, which caused us to retreat from the sweet goodness of the orchards, back to the shaded yards of the farmhouse for a game of cowboys and indians.

Written for the Sunday Whirl.  The words this week are bird, bridge, unstable, wild, bend, rock, retreat, bear, lane, fallen, meadow, and island.  Brenda chose the words from signs in Glacier National Park.

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About Sabra Bowers

Poet / Blogger / Writer
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42 Responses to Childhood Memories

  1. brenda w says:

    Your childhood mirrors my own. Thank you for this gentle piece filled with nostalgia for me. I remember our minnow bucket, and I remember chipping a tooth when I tripped during a game of cowboys and Indians. You don’t see kids playing that game anymore, at least not in Montana. You and I would have been fast friends as kids…I’m glad we’ve met in this other interesting world.

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Brenda, fun to hear of your similar childhood play. I have a permanent bruise from a game of cowboys and Indians. I too think we would have been fast friends and I’m glad our paths have crossed in our world of writing.

  2. magicalmysticalteacher says:

    Memories are important, and this is a delightful weaving of yours or someone else’s. In the end, it doesn’t matter whose memories they are, or whether they are real or imagined. What matters most is the care you have taken with the telling. Delightful!

    A Weird Quartet

  3. michellepond says:

    Beautiful piece, Sabra.

  4. Lisa says:

    Sabra, thank you for the lovely start to my Sunday, long ago days touch yearnings for simple times and brings me to gratefullness for this day.

  5. Stan Ski says:

    Great memories…

  6. WabiSabi says:

    Although I did not have the orchard or the crows or the corn field, the innocent childhood is there in my memory too. Thank you for taking me back to ‘cowboys and indians’ for a sweet memory trip this morning!Tanka Whirl

  7. Sounds like fun memories of a happy childhood! Glad you had some wildlife but no black bears on the farm!

  8. This is the kind of story I’d like to keep reading. The wordle words worked well.

  9. 1sojournal says:

    This is such a gentle and peace filled write. It could easily be defined as a prose poem. It is important to keep those childhood memories alive, they warm us in later years in a fashion that nothing else can.

    Elizabeth
    http://soulsmusic.wordpress.com/2013/06/30/wild-gift/

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Thank you, Elizabeth. I’m learning that it is important to record and keep even the smallest of childhood memories. I have few memories and writing a poem about a memory has helped me savor it. You are so right about keeping the memories alive. Writing does that for us. Thank you for visiting my blog today.

  10. Gerry Wilson says:

    Sabra, you brought back memories for me, too, although I was a “town” girl (about 1500 people!) and visited my uncles and aunts who lived out in the country. Beautiful memoir piece.

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Thank you, Gerry. I think a lot of us played the same games and certainly we all traveled to the country. So glad you stopped by and left your thoughts. Now I can think of it as a memoir piece. 🙂

  11. Pamela says:

    This reminds me of my summers spent at my aunt’s place in Blairstown, NJ. Nice prose piece, Sabra. I did see a black bear one summer, and it scared the daylight out of me.

    Pamela

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Glad my piece brought up memories for you, Pamela. I’m with you…seeing a black bear would scare me, big time. Thanks for stopping by and leaving your thoughts.

  12. That’s just lovely Sabra. I love finding out little things about you. You know what? My gradfather had a pet magpie, a corvid. He was such a clever bird. He’d speak to grandfather calling him “papa” and mirroring things grandma said, (secretly I think that drove grandpa up the wall). I’d love to have a pet crow but could never keep a bird in a cage. 🙂

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Thank you, Veronica. I have the same feeling about a bird in a cage and also fish in a tank. Your grandfather’s pet magpie sounds really interesting. Crows will stay around a place and come daily. They recognize human faces. I love to see them here in the suburbs of Atlanta. They remind me of home and I do admire their abilities. So glad you visited my blog today!

  13. Cathy says:

    Love it but too bad you never got see a black bear. I live in bear country and this year, seeing just a tab too many of them. There pictures of them on my blog.

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Cathy, I’ve seen a black bear, but in the North Georgia mountains…not on the farm. Oh, I will be sure to check out your blog for the pictures. Thank you for stopping by and leaving me a comment. Much appreciated.

  14. Marianne says:

    Sounds like a wonderful place to grow up. My 3 younger brothers and I grew up at a lake in the country. Your poem brought back many happy memories.

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Marianne, I’m glad my little piece brought back memories for you. It was a fine place to grow up, a very beautiful setting and great folks lived all around. Maybe we can read some of you childhood memories about the lake. Thank you for leaving me a comment. Best!

  15. oldegg says:

    Childhood is such a rich source of the writer’s inspiration and we have been rewarded handsomely with this piece of yours.

  16. Irene says:

    Memories filled with lush details.

  17. whimsygizmo says:

    Beautiful memory, Sabra. You take me there. Thank you.

  18. stanalei15 says:

    Fun summer memories, Sabra. Thanks for sharing them and triggering a few of my own.

  19. Jane says:

    What delightful memories; I enjoyed this very much. 🙂

  20. claudia says:

    some lovely memories and brought me back to my own childhood as well… when i was visiting my uncle i too used to help bring the cows back into the stable.. no snakes though where i live… but we collected eggs from the chicken stable in the evening… a lovely write sabra…and i’m always up for a round of cowboy and indian game..smiles

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Claudia, it is great to hear from you and to hear of your similar childhood experiences. I think my mother thought our eggs were to valuable to allow us to collect. I have a picture of me and brother dressed for cowboy and indian play. Thank you for stopping by and leaving me a comment.

  21. Mark Spruill says:

    Sabra,

    What a wonderful little story. A glimpse into another time and place. Thanks for sharing it.

    Mark

    • Sabra Bowers says:

      Thank you, Mark. It certainly was another time and place and I miss the clean air and fresh water of those days. My bother has passed and so my mind is often drawn back to our days of play. Good to see you here, Mark.

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